In the United States, certain religious schools are legally permitted to limit or discontinue student enrollment if:

the atmosphere or conduct within a particular home, the activities of a parent or guardian, or the activities of the student are counter to, or are in opposition to, the biblical lifestyle the school teaches. This includes, but is not limited to contumacious behavior, divisive conduct, and participating in, supporting, or condoning sexual immorality, homosexual activity or bi-sexual activity, promoting such practices, or being unable to support the moral principles of the school. (Lev. 20:13 and Romans 1:27.)


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Our April 5, 2017 post highlighted a decision of the Seventh Circuit Court of Appeals finding that Title VII protections against discrimination on the basis of gender extend to sexual orientation.  That court referenced US Supreme Court decisions such as the 2015 same sex marriage case, Obergefell v. Hodges, in concluding that “[t]he logic of the Supreme Court’s decisions, as well as the common-sense reality that it is actually impossible to discriminate on the basis of sexual orientation without discriminating on the basis of sex, persuade us that the time has come to overrule our previous cases that have endeavored to find and observe that line.”

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The United States Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (“EEOC”) announced on June 2, 2016 its intention to issue a revised comprehensive enforcement guidance addressing national origin discrimination under Title VII.  The proposed guidance will be open for public comment for thirty days only beginning July 1, 2016.

The EEOC has issued a number of guidance documents

Photo: jaliyaj via Flickr (CC by 2.0)
Photo: jaliyaj via Flickr (CC by 2.0)

Last month, national retail chain Target announced that it would allow transgender employees and customers to choose the restroom and fitting room facilities that correspond to their gender identity.  Target took this step in response to laws, and proposed laws, in places like North

Earlier this week, the New Hampshire Supreme Court issued an opinion holding that the New Hampshire Law Against Discrimination, RSA Chapter 354-A, can impose liability upon individual employees for aiding and abetting discrimination in the workplace, and for retaliation against another employee in the workplace of a qualifying employer.

The issue came before the New