As more employees are finding themselves on self-quarantine or limited duty and looking at possible furloughs and layoffs the state and federal governments are looking at ways to provide financial relief.

Early Saturday morning the U.S. House of Representatives passed the Families First Coronavirus Relief Act through bipartisan efforts brokered by Rep. Nancy Pelosi and Treasury Secretary Stephen Mnuchin.  Some of the highlights of the bill are as follows:


Continue Reading

The unfortunate COVID-19 outbreak in the United States presents unique and complicated issues for employers big and small. The ultimate appropriate resolution for these issues is not yet known as the length and extent of the disease is currently ever-evolving.

There is, however, an excellent Interim Guidance issued by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention which provides comprehensive recommended strategies that employers can implement immediately.


Continue Reading

Six key questions that New Hampshire employers may have about the virus.

Whether the spread of Covid-19 is a serious pandemic or a lot of overblown media-driven hysteria, businesses are seeing very real impact on their daily operations due to this illness.

Here are some common questions about what the World Health Organization has identified

The Department of Homeland Security Citizenship and Immigration Services published a notice in the Federal Register on January 31, 2020, alerting the public to the release and requirement of a new version of the ubiquitous Form I-9, Employment Eligibility Verification document.  The new form was available for download and use beginning on that date.  We are presently in a 90-day transition time during which employers may use the new form, with a version date of “Rev. 10/21/2019”, or the prior version of the form with a version date of “Rev. 07/17/2017N”.

Continue Reading

It’s that time of year HR Pros!  Holiday parties, too much food and drink, devolving into that awful HR role of party planner and gift giver, and a list a mile long of things you meant to get to before year end which, somehow, just didn’t get done.  Here’s an idea.  Let’s not think about what we didn’t do, but focus instead on a real plan for what we realistically can accomplish in 2020, the start of a brand new decade!  I’m not talking about strategic planning or high level forecasting for your business, which is of course critical to success.  I’m talking about simple things which you know you should do (or we employment attorneys have been telling you  to do); things you can do yourself or delegate. Here’s my list of 2020 to-do’s!

Continue Reading

In an opinion letter dated April 29, 2019, the U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) explained that some service providers working for a virtual marketplace company (VMC) are independent contractors under the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA).   This opinion letter identifies the test the DOL is expected to use when considering the classification of workers

Photo: Beatrice Murch via Flickr (CC by 2.0)

The US Supreme Court recently announced it accepted three cases that will determine the scope of “sex” discrimination under federal law.  Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, as amended, makes it unlawful for employers to discriminate against employees on the

Photo: Moe Fournier via Flickr (Public Domain)

A majority of states now authorize the use of either medical or recreational marijuana, but it seems like CBD or cannabidiol is garnering as much attention as the stuff that actually causes the munchies.  What is all the buzz about?


Continue Reading

On February 1, 2019 the Keene Sentinel reported that a Massachusetts construction company had been hit with more than $64,000 in fines after an audit conducted by the New Hampshire Department of Labor. Although the bulk of the fines were related to the misclassification of employees as independent contractors, there were also a number of recordkeeping violations found.

The Keene Sentinel article devotes significant attention to the problems of trying to classify individuals as independent contractors under NH state law, a very difficult burden to meet. The result of the audit and the fines imposed on the business, however, showcase how difficult it is for businesses who typically do not operate in a state to establish a workforce there and be in compliance with state laws.


Continue Reading